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Game Changer for Video Gamers


A new range of accessories that make gaming controllers easier to use for players with a range of disabilities has been launched.


Thumb Soldiers is an innovative, low-cost range of interchangeable thumb stick attachments allowing players to modify and customise their existing controllers, enabling the right grip or control.


Designed and manufactured by engineer David Chapman, the accessories promise to revolutionise the market where players have had to pay a premium for adapted controllers produced by some major gaming brands.


“The idea and desire to improve the playability of games with a simple attachment to the thumb sticks had been bouncing around in my head for years,” said David.


“But I couldn’t see how an attachment would stay in place or, if it did, be any better at suiting individual players.


“My epiphany moment was envisaging a virtually solid connection to fit all standard controllers that in turn would allow for a range of attachments to assist with comfort, precision, accessibility and personal set-up.”


First step was to design a game changing knuckle or docking clip, to which all Thumb Soldiers would attach, that would wrap and lock securely to a controller with no tools and no disassembly and that would maintain full motion range.


“There is different footwear designed to suit different sports, to level the playing field if you like,” added David.


“Why shouldn’t that be the case in gaming, where different controller attachments adapted to different games and playing styles allow everyone from competitive players to occasional players to improve their performance and enjoyment.


“That very much includes people with health conditions and physical impairments who struggle with coordination, grip or deftness of touch and we’ve designed specific attachments with them in mind.”


To find out more about the various attachments – from Rock n Roller and Racer to Shrooms and Step Up - go to www.thumbsoldiers.com and read a full interview with David Chapman in the November edition of Living with Disability.


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